PDF The Wells (The Hope Trilogy Book 1)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Wells (The Hope Trilogy Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Wells (The Hope Trilogy Book 1) book. Happy reading The Wells (The Hope Trilogy Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Wells (The Hope Trilogy Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Wells (The Hope Trilogy Book 1) Pocket Guide.

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Aug 24, Miriam rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: lovers of history, fantasy, adventure, war stories, or witty dialogue.

Monster Space The Shadows Trilogy #1 Science Fiction Audiobook

Shelves: fantasy , parallel-dimensions , favorite , adventure. Those who read The Death of the Necromancer related to this book, but not requisite for understanding it will remember Vien as an urbane, prosperous city at the height of its power. From a cultural capital and political powerhouse, it has transformed in the space of only a few years as a mysterious and apparently unstoppable enemy reduces the city to ruins and its inhabitants to refugees.

Before the war, Tremaine was a successful playwright with a circle of entertaining arty friends. Now she v Those who read The Death of the Necromancer related to this book, but not requisite for understanding it will remember Vien as an urbane, prosperous city at the height of its power. Now she volunteers for the dangerous work of driving ambulances and goes home alone to her missing father's rambling old house of Coldcourt.

To help the dismal war effort, her family has donated both money and their collection of magical spheres to a research group trying to find a way to circumvent the enemy's immunity to magic. One night one of the wizard researchers, a family friend, comes to ask Tremaine if she has any additional spheres. Little does she know that her decision to accompany Gerard to the Institute will send her into danger and across dimensions Mar 26, Rachel Neumeier rated it it was amazing. Read at least three or four chapters before you decide.

The Pre-Republic Era

And after that, the books really take off! Tremaine is my favorite character EVER! She is right up there with my other favorite-ever characters, like Miles Vorkosigan and Vlad Taltos and Eugenides. I mean, there is romance — but it starts late in the series and it is never, but never, a gushy obsessive romance. I love Florian, too, though. I kept rather hoping Ander would get shot or fall off a cliff or at least see the error of his ways and start taking Tremaine seriously, but, sigh, I guess there really are jackasses like that in the world and he does provide a certain something. Like, a contrast to Ilias, for one thing.

Because Ilias! Tremaine is my favorite, but Ilias is also great. I love his relationship with his friend and foster-brother, Giliead. You are probably getting the idea that there are a lot of characters. Particularly since everyone is distinctive. Those gates! New corners to peek around just everywhere, and this is Martha Wells, right? So you know the scenery is going to be grand-scale and stunning. Ruined cities everywhere, and all of them different. But with fey that seriously affected things until cold iron became more common. The customs are so different and the interaction between the characters is really enhanced by this.

Just take it as read that every scene is beautifully set, okay? The plot: The overarching plot is complex, but it hangs together just fine. The conquerers are. Almost anything I say about them would be too much, so silence seems the best policy here. The first book is really pretty well self contained, which is handy if you want to give the trilogy a try without committing to all three books, but the second definitely feeds right into the third.

The romance could not be more removed from the simplistic insta-romances we see everywhere today and that for me are such a turn-off. Wells handles her romance with subtlety and humor and lets her people be complicated and conflicted. But not in an annoying way! Not that kind of conflicted! There was some political idiocy in the third book, which was painful to read. Thankfully the scenes where we have to endure moronic self-serving politicians working hard to seize defeat from the jaws of victory are quite brief. The overall plot is impressively coherent, all the complicated problems on three different worlds arising from one basic source.

The tiny little deus ex moments here and there are actually fitting and believable. Overall: This is a great trilogy. It's definitely a keeper; I know I'll be reading this one again. View all 8 comments. Initially picked up because of the Bingo challenge, I hoped this would be a good fit for a difficult square. I have no idea why I persisted. The book is initially split into two storylines. In the first, Tremaine, a playwright, is contacted by a group of sorcerers because she possesses the last magical sphere that could help Ile-Rien in the war against Gardier, a nation of people who attack Initially picked up because of the Bingo challenge, I hoped this would be a good fit for a difficult square.

In the first, Tremaine, a playwright, is contacted by a group of sorcerers because she possesses the last magical sphere that could help Ile-Rien in the war against Gardier, a nation of people who attacked suddenly and with seemingly no reason. The sphere doesn't work without her presence, so she's dragged along on a dangerous adventure. Then we also follow Illias and Giliead as they explore a cave occupied by evil wizards. The storylines eventually converge, though the beginning was quite confusing - I felt like I was missing out on a lot of context. The worldbuilding is where it should have shined.

I haven't seen a secondary-world book that combined electricity and magic before, or one that would contain contact between two civilisations on very different technological levels. And I love books about culture clashes. By all means, it should have worked. Unfortunately, it's a colossal yawner regardless.

It's quite hard to put a finger on why, too. The prose is of the unremarkable windowpane kind could not find a single quote , but this alone shouldn't have been so bad. I think the biggest problems are that I couldn't connect to any of the characters - they all seem quite bland and two-dimensional. The book tells us that Tremaine is suicidal, but it doesn't really show her mental health issues or discuss them much - and what's worse, view spoiler [in the end it turned out to be magic, which put a really bad taste in my mouth hide spoiler ]. And the Gardier come off as the standard evil-for-the-sake-of-evil.

The plot I found the sphere a bit of a convenient deus-ex-machina at points, and most plot twists predictable. It definitely doesn't reinvent the wheel. It's really not a bad book. It doesn't have many glaring flaws. But it didn't have many virtues either, and definitely nothing that would make me excited about reading on - the above paragraph feels like justifications for the simple facts that I was bored, and it was a chore to read.

Aggressively mediocre, I suppose, is the term. Anyway, I'm unlikely to continue the series. Not recommended to: most people More reviews on my blog, To Other Worlds. Shelves: 1-star-and-a-half , epic-fantasy , fantasy. Warning: slight spoilers below. An obscure epic fantasy that came highly recommended by Kate Elliott, for instance. I like her books and the way she talks about books, particularly the social consciousness with which she reads, but I have to stop taking her fantasy recs.

But in the end this bored me so much I took nearly a month to finish i Warning: slight spoilers below. But in the end this bored me so much I took nearly a month to finish it, a bad sign for an adventure fantasy book of under pages. Wells must have heavily workshopped the first sentence — for that matter, the first chapter — because this book started off very well, only to disappoint within the first hundred pages.

Not me. Too bad the characterization turns out to be so flat. And the minor characters? Forget about it. But back to that beginning. But all too soon, the leads are dumped on a remote island and spend pages running around tunnels and fighting. That was where it lost me, and by the time we return to the original setting toward the end of the story, I was so bored by these shallow and static characters that I no longer cared. Nor did the worldbuilding turn out as deep as expected; this is more the kind of fantasy where people conk enemies mysterious evil invaders with no discernible reason for their belligerence, natch over the head than the kind dealing with social intricacies.

But after this bait-and-switch I won't be reading the sequels, so I'm glad there's at least a bit of resolution here. View 1 comment. Dec 15, Elsiekate rated it it was amazing. Mar 22, Just A. Thirty or so years have passed since the previous book, and much has changed in Ile-Rien. For one, the technology has jumped form midth century to early s I noticed that the tech advance in Ile-Rien is a lot faster than in our world, but magic may have something to do with that.

Most of the main character of the previous book are missing, absent or dead. Ile-Rien has been losing a war for about three years. In the middle of all this, two sets of characters from two different worlds com Thirty or so years have passed since the previous book, and much has changed in Ile-Rien. In the middle of all this, two sets of characters from two different worlds come together: the daughter of Our Heroes from the last book, and her wizard friends who are trying to find out who the country's mysterious enemy is and how to stop them, and a pair of warrior brothers from a parallel world that's still iron age tech, who hunt wizards for a living.

The two groups don't speak the same language when they meet. It's exciting :D I love the culture clash, and how it continues in large and small ways through the series. You've got diesel punk people eventually teaming up with age of heroes warriors to combat people with s ish tech, and the ways that works and doesn't is a constant theme and source of both conflict and entertainment. As always, it's the character that really carry it through. The protagonist from the Ile-Rien side was more or less raised by James Moriarty, and as a catalogue of issues because of it, including suicidal depression and an inability to make friends at the start of the story.

I loved watching her figure herself out, and try to alternately use and avoid what her father taught her to save her country. For the iron age side, there's a young wizard hunter with massive abandonment and loyalty issues a familiar type for Wells , and already something of an outsider view of his own people. Together they fight crime! Well, evil wizards. Along with them is a whole cast of supporting characters, including many interesting women, and a sort of robot, and it was just really hard to put this book down.

Or the next one. Or the one after that. Oct 10, Gail rated it liked it. This is a VERY different fantasy. Almost a steampunk fantasy, because the magic is worked by means of mechanical doohickeys. In one of the universes of this story. This story crosses multiple universes. Two, anyway, with a probable third. The heroine's world is at war with these technologically advanced magic haters that fly in blimps and fry the magical instruments of her world. The hero lives in a completely different universe where ALL wizards are evil, and all magic spells are curses.

He's a sidekick of the current avatar of the local god and goes around with him executing wizards. But the folks who have moved into the last wizard's old lair are different. They have these machine things. The story moves the hero and heroine closer and closer in their individual worlds, until finally they meet in his and their respective worlds ally against these bad guys. This is the first book in a trilogy, and a very interesting read. I'm going to have to order the next two off the internet and read them. They weren't in the book store. Mar 29, Mikhail rated it really liked it.

Very, very rough start -- it's like a crossover event with two series you haven't read before. But if you can get past the first couple of chapters it starts to flow much more smoothly, making for an interesting book. Not really Wells's best that would be the Death of the Necromancer , but good all the same. View all 4 comments. Spoiler-Free Review I think. The story opened with a killer hook. What a fantastic opening line! It drew me in and introduced the heroine really well. Tremaine is an interesting character, full of delicious dichotomies. I love her moments of vulnerability because the rest of the time she's as tough as they come, but not with the kick-butt charisma of some other tough characters.

She's so awkward. Ilias is strong with a good sense of humor; Giliead is protective and uncomfortable with the Spoiler-Free Review I think. Ilias is strong with a good sense of humor; Giliead is protective and uncomfortable with the responsibility put on him--and perhaps a little lonely. The first chapter was great. Then, like someone hit the breaks, it slowed way down. The introduction of Ilias and Giliead was not my cup of tea.

There was a lot of narration about past events and not much action. I don't even need swashbuckling. Not exactly riveting. But I held out hope and after a few chapters it picked up again. One thing I really like about this book it how not much happens but it fills lots of pages without feeling slow except for the first few chapters, of course.

I know that may sound weird--"not much happens"--but what I mean is that the events are so localized, so focused, that the characters, once entangled in those events, have no time to meander. Once the ball got rolling, it kept rolling. At the same time, with all that rolling going on, it didn't feel rushed.

There were scenes with crazy chases and fights, and then there were scenes where they just sat around tending to wounds and it was interesting. There was a good balance on the whole. On the writing style: there were many, many commas. For example: "She struck hard-packed sand, the breath knocked out of her, the man landing heavily a few feet away.

Wheezing, she twisted, kicking out at him. Caught by surprise and badly shocked, he lost his grip on. Sometimes it just felt like the sentences could have been broken up a bit more. But that might just be personal preference; I tend to like short and punchy interspersed with the occasional long bit for emphasis.

Overall, the writing was of good quality and didn't really bother me. On the world-building: detailed and fascinating! I really liked Ile-Rein and Syrnai and how well they were described, how well the cultures were developed. Another thing I thought was absolutely fantastic was how she played the language card. All these races speak different languages. But everything is written in plain English--no funny keyboard slap thing that are meant to look like foreign languages. That doesn't give me anything. Martha Wells did a fantastic job with this, making you feel the language barrier between the characters without creating one between them and the reader.

The realization at the climax had me gripping the book tightly! Overall I really like this book! My only complaint is the initial slowness.

Buy for others

But I know from experience that novel beginnings are hard, so I'm not going to fling around any blame. Martha Wells is one of my favorite writers. Her ability to create entire new worlds and, in particular, beings and societies, is amazing. She's very detailed and always displays great imagination. That being said, this trilogy was the first time I had trouble finishing one of her books.

Minor plot description: We've got Ile-Rien, a world technologically set in about the s, except without airplanes or cannons. They also have magic. They are in a war with a mysterious race called the Gardier wh Martha Wells is one of my favorite writers. They are in a war with a mysterious race called the Gardier who is kicking their butt in a major way.

Nothing is known about them. Eventually, Ile-Rien wizards manage to cross over into a different world, Cineth.

Clean YA books for teens, tweens, or anyone - Clean Teen Books

Cineth is technologically backwards and the only magic there is performed by wizards who are both evil and mad. That should be enough to give you the flavor of the thing. The modern Ile-Rien is a pretty standard place with few surprises, so Wells' abilities are wasted here. The Gardier, well You can't beat that for boring and it was one of the most frustrating things I ran into with these books. The only reason I managed to actually finish the trilogy is Cineth. That's standard Wells' goodness. The characters, the idiosyncrasies, the laws, everything here is rich and absorbing.

And not less the plight of their people in their struggle against the evil wizard Ixion. The labyrinthine Ile-Rien ship, the Ravenna, also provides a tremendous setting for this part of the plot to continue to play out. The biggest trouble, of course, is that is is only the secondary plot. The primary was such a burden to get on with that I would only recommend this book to hardcore Wells' fans. Jun 13, Rain rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , fantasy , adult-fiction , airships.

Some Hope: A Trilogy

I've committed to trying to give more word reviews instead of my typical stars, including going back and writing reviews as I re-read anything I've already read. The Wizard Hunters is a book I frequently re-read. It's always loaded on my nook, although the first time I read it, it was a paperback version I picked up in a used book store. My usual used bookstore bookcheck involves picking out something with a title or cover that draws me in, reading the back or the inside flap, and then reading on I've committed to trying to give more word reviews instead of my typical stars, including going back and writing reviews as I re-read anything I've already read.

My usual used bookstore bookcheck involves picking out something with a title or cover that draws me in, reading the back or the inside flap, and then reading one or two pages to see if it clicks. I knew from the very first sentence of The Wizard Hunters that I was going to buy the book, which is rarer than one would like it to be.

I was not disappointed and years after the fact still love to reread the Ile-Rien novels. I was hopelessly pleased when some short stories were released later on, and always like to revisit the world even if I think Wells is done writing for it. The characters are well-written and interesting, and the plot within the three books of the Fall of Ile-Rien trilogy is tightly woven and packs a few surprises.

It's easy to get attached to everyone, and while the first time through I was impatient to get back to Tremaine and the Rienish when POVs swapped in the first book, I also know I quickly came to like Ilias and Gilead for their wry senses of humor. Wells always has a really good grasp on conversation and banter, and her characters are always fun to read. That definitely shows through in this installment, and the story itself keeps me hooked time and time again.

I always recommend this trilogy to everyone, because I love it forever. Jun 15, Brittany rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy. Martha Wells has more imagination and more heart than any other 12 authors put together. Unless you're exceptionally persnickety about which authors you pick and the list includes a lot of names like "Pratchett," "Dunnett," and "Bujold.

In the Raksura books, she created the best tree-houses ever. Here, she reminagines World War II and the London Blitz, being sure to incorporate world-travel and a gorgeous cruise ship Martha Wells has more imagination and more heart than any other 12 authors put together. Here, she reminagines World War II and the London Blitz, being sure to incorporate world-travel and a gorgeous cruise ship taken over by the soldiers where our protagonists get to live and run around.

Apparently, the Queen Ravenna was based on the real live Queen Mary. There's also magic, adventure, romance, intrigue, mystery, and politics. It's just so well done and, have I mentioned? Jun 28, Wealhtheow rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy , mannerpunk. Dammit, Wells!

Her first book was excellent, her second was good, her third was terrible and this, her fourth, is only passably good. The story starts with the main character trying to kill herself. Wells excels at constructing theories of magic and dealing with the ensuing complications, and the novel itself is set in a magical Dammit, Wells! Wells excels at constructing theories of magic and dealing with the ensuing complications, and the novel itself is set in a magical version of Britain during the Blitz.

Good enough that I'll read the sequels. View all 6 comments. Jun 22, Li rated it really liked it Shelves: read-in , fantasy , cross-posted. I loved the prequel, The Death of the Necromancer , but it took me a while to settle into this story. But once I did, it worked for me - well, strong fantasy with a subtle romance would obviously tick all my boxes. This was written almost ten years ago, and I thought its age showed slightly, but overall, good read.

Feb 01, Jessica rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy , own.


  • A Very Brief History of the Book-Publishing Industry (Entering The Publishing Industry Series Book 1).
  • Tapestry of Healing?
  • The African Trilogy, Book 1 (Lust, Money & Murder #7)?
  • Giovanni XXIII e il Concilio Vaticano II (Varie) (Italian Edition).
  • Book 1: WHEN GRAVEYARDS YAWN – FREE Wildclown Novel » Welcome to ehonahyjabim.tk.
  • Heard about Reedsy Discovery?.

Read this for my old book group. His brilliantly wrought fictional trilogy features a character-driven narrative with flashes of conflict and emotion relieved by a stringent humor. Some Hope is the tumultuous journey of Patrick Melrose, following along as he endures an abusive childhood under the tyranny of a deliberately cruel father and a drunken mother, through resulting addiction, dereliction, and bitterness that threaten to overtake him completely. On Patrick's travels, readers meet a great many social climbers determined to avoid the label "working class," who provide cautionary evidence for a life of greater significance.

From detestably vapid socialites to the loathsome elder Melrose, St. Aubyn's characters are exquisitely rendered and revealed bit by bit in precise sections, like subjects of a biology class. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published October 30th by Open City Books first published More Details Original Title. Patrick Melrose Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Some Hope , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Polish edition of Patrick Melrose novels was published in two parts. The first one contains three installments. Yes, that one that starts with these words: They fuck you up, your mum and dad.

They may not mean to, but they do. They fill you w Polish edition of Patrick Melrose novels was published in two parts. They fill you with the faults they had And add some extra, just for you. The first part Never Mind was the best to me. And the most devastating too. It was brilliantly written, devilishly inteligent, full of acerbic and witty comments and ironic and spot-on portraits of rich idlers.

But it employs also traumatic experience of five year old Patrick molested by his father. No matter how scathing the writing feels, no matter how apt, how astute observations of St. The second part Bad News is set several years later and gives us an image of adrift, self-destructive and almost constantly stoned and drugged Patrick. After the death of his father he goes to New York to collect his ashes and through some days of staying there, through cacophony of voices in his head and wild images flashing kaleidoscopically through his brain, experiences private hell.

But of course St. You can't help but laugh seeing how Patrick braced himself to face his dead father, how he summoned all his courage and energy to finally attend the wrong ceremony.

ADVERTISEMENT

But then again this part reminds beginning of the cycle, is waspish and mostly satirical, though employing so many new protagonists wasn't in my opinion necessary. Patrick, now a recovering addict, acknowledges the need to find something more filling than pure hatred to carry on with his life but also experiences kind of epiphany that allows him to confess what happend to him in childhood. Aubyn feels very reliable to me and his dissection of family life, its destructive character and toxic relationship from one hand and sardonic portrait of aristocratic milieu from the other one is brilliantly observed and rendered.

But while Elena Ferrante with her Neapolitan saga depictured life of the poor family and Knausgard led us through tribulations and struggles of a member of middle class then St. Aubyn showed a drama behind closed doors of posh residence of his high-born family. Despite their different background and experience there are some similies. What they share together is the wave of criticism and outrage that fell on them.

Ferrante was mercilessly pursued in order to reveal her identity, Knausgard was accused of public muckraking and desire to make money on family matters and St.


  • Buying Options.
  • The Wizard Hunters (The Fall of Ile-Rien, #1) by Martha Wells.
  • Quirk & Peccadillo.

Aubyn was almost crucified for revealing dirty and shocking family secrets. View all 26 comments. A fabulous novel. If you come from a family that is in any way dysfunctional, this book takes you to a bar, gets you drunk, and gives you The Talk on how to deal with it sometimes by showing you how not to.

It is very, very well written, in an intelligent and sometimes allusive way, but please do not think the frills detract from the content - they somehow make the content more manageable for people who had similar experiences. Also, I'm not qualified to judge the accuracy of the book's descri A fabulous novel. Also, I'm not qualified to judge the accuracy of the book's description of drug addiction, but it looks pretty spot-on to me.

An excellent read; will revisit, and by this I mean buying a copy and highlighting the hell out of it. View all 3 comments. Jul 15, Violet wells rated it liked it Shelves: contemporary-british-fiction. Four stars for the onslaught of brilliant and searingly funny sentences. Three stars for the architecture with the dizzying overlapping of characters, a good few of whom seemed gratuitous. Some Hope is an autobiographical novel, the last part of a trilogy, made up largely of vignettes of biting social satire — territorially, in chronological terms, half way between Eveyln Waugh and Martin Amis.

Jun 23, Justin Evans rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. For the first 19 pages, I was disgusted: would this turn out to be the usual, over-descriptive, self-pitying mush? For God's sake, why do you need to say 'black and white magpie'? What the heck other colour magpies are there? Rage ensued. The next day, I read through the rest of 'Never Mind,' the first novel, straight. It whupped me. Great stuff- fantastic characters, intelligent themes, beautiful writing, funny and emotionally stunning. So I got to work on 'Bad News,' which was slightly above-p For the first 19 pages, I was disgusted: would this turn out to be the usual, over-descriptive, self-pitying mush?

So I got to work on 'Bad News,' which was slightly above-par drug-lit. Better written than most of the "and then I tipped a few grains of smack into the spoon which was already black from over-use and applied the flame and watched as it bubbled and pulled back the syringe and plunged it into my arm but because I'm such a hardcore drug user I can't find my veins so I ruined my hit and Pretty weak compared to 'Never Mind. It's post drugs, thank the gods, so we don't have minute descriptions of works; it's also not as concentrated as 'Never Mind. He's very clever; you could write a dissertation, well, maybe a Master's thesis, on this book alone.

It's not flawless, but in a world of tentative, day-in-the-life-of realism and lame brained 'experiment' or quirk, you're better off reading this than most things. Princess Margaret gets a particularly violent mocking. I'm a romantic. I liked this, the third of the quartet, The Patrick Melrose Novels. I don't know if this works well as a stand alone, but it really was what I needed. Patrick, a recovering drug addict is actually recovering. He examines his past and finally admits that he was a victim. The people he knew as a child are now 35 years older. Many are exactly the same.

The setting is the day of a birthday party for Sonny, one of the gentry. The party goers are a motley group of well healed, ill int I'm a romantic. The party goers are a motley group of well healed, ill intended, very connected , disconnected acquaintances and Princess Margaret. Patrick, the sobered hero, attends with a ghost of his late father, David. Many of Patrick and David's class are known for their lack of achievement and excess of money, habits and sneering sarcasm and snobbery. The dysfunction in their marriages and their families are exposed as frigid and meaningless.

While at this party, of good friends and malicious creeps, Patrick is able to find a little bit of sympathy for Dead David who took Patrick's innocence and life and left Patrick with bitterness and emptiness. Patrick is still young enough and old enough to have Some Hope. I'm looking forward to a sip of Mother's Milk.

View all 5 comments. The American Anne Eisen, who had wanted to 'rescue' Patrick in a critical scene in the first novel, but failed, teases him about the obsessions which have gripped him for so long: 'father-bashing', 'drugs' and 'snobbery'. Finally, Patrick seems able to put all three of these into some sort of context where they no longer have such a dark hold over him.

The great set-piece of the novel is the birthday party of Sonny Gravesend at his country home Cheatley. Nearly all of the characters from the first two novels will be gathered there for the occasion - along with a few new additions, like the French ambassador and his wife and Princess Margaret. There is a large quantity of biting social satire in the book; St.

Aubyn's has a real gift for dialogue.

Navigation menu

But set against all of this 'babble' - all of the taunts, brags, false flatteries and sharp mockeries - are a few crucial conversations, mostly between Patrick and his old friend Johnny Hall, in which Patrick attempts to use words to be truthful, to 'confess', to truly connect with another human being. Some Hope the third of St. Aubyn's Patrick Melrose novels is a crackling piece of nasty business. Paul Melrose has lived surprisingly into his 30's and now is reluctantly but successfully not abusing drugs. This does not keep him from missing them just using them. A cavalcade of British snobs, and assorted other wealthy types are congregating for an epic party in honor of Princess Margaret.

St Aubyn brings these many characters within the range of his satire and they are for the most part a vile Some Hope the third of St. St Aubyn brings these many characters within the range of his satire and they are for the most part a vile and bigoted bunch. The dialogue and repartee of characters is icily funny but nevertheless enjoyable. Many times I thought I wish I said that.

Patrick Melrose does seem to have evolved from the drug addled zombie burying his evil father in Bad News, the previous Melrose novel. Spoiler alert I am close to finishing Mother's Milk the 4th Melrose novel which i would now cite as the best so far. I did enjoy Some Hope frankly because it was very funny and the stakes were not as high for the protagonist. As a series the work is even better but each book can stand on its own.

Evelyn Waugh meets Bruce Wagner in the novels of St. Aubyn and that is preety good combination to me. May 03, Elizabeth Spiers rated it it was amazing. I've bought this book over 20 times because I keep loaning it to people and I never get it back. This may be a function of widespread latent kleptomania in my social circles, but I suspect it's because the book is an excellent read and no one wants to give it up.

Aubyn's writing is caustic and brutal, but also blisteringly funny--thus the frequent and not-entirely-surprising comparison to Evelyn Waugh. Breathtaking, audacious, stunning. It is about so much more than addiction or child abuse, come to that. It's characters, particularly the central one, and the thousands of walk-on parts, are so vividly written, and the things they with such precision relayed, that you cannot help being uncomfortably close to what goes on. I loved this novel. This was a really compelling read and I am really rather glad to have picked it up before watching the adaptation.

Although I have just started the Sky version and it is very good, the book reaches hidden depths and has strengths in different ways. For example, where the adaptation uses flash backs to reveal Patrick's past of the first volume, I like the way the book spits that out before you see its impacts evolve over Patrick's following decades. I love Patrick's dry cynicism, his wit, his self This was a really compelling read and I am really rather glad to have picked it up before watching the adaptation.

I love Patrick's dry cynicism, his wit, his self-loathing which comes across as slow and self- depreciating to other characters. I also noticed how, somehow, St Aubyn manages to make sure Patrick never really feels like the main character in his own book. The writing style passes the baton every few paragraphs, taking the narrative through the daily lives of all the other members of high society, no matter how frivolous and pompous their stories may be.

I guess what he's trying to show is how, even through the seeming self-obsession of Patrick's lifestyle in his grief, it's happening in a complex social bubble of high society. Now for the 2nd volume before I get onto the next episode! Dec 27, Ann Olszewski rated it it was amazing. I'd heard about St. Aubyn's Patrick Melrose books several years ago, and had been planning to read them for some time. I regret my delay - this trilogy the first three of five books is, as a whole, one of the best things I've read in several years. To begin, St. Aubyn's writing is strikingly beautiful. His use of metaphor is never hackneyed or contrived, but perfectly fitting.

There were some passages that I re-read several times simply so I could admire them again. But these short novels are no I'd heard about St. But these short novels are not just elegant and precise prose - Patrick Melrose's journey from sexual abuse by his father, through years of cocaine and heroin addiction, to sobriety and making a truce with his past, makes for gripping reading. The first two books are so very sad - the rape of a young child and the subsequent descent into drug hell.